NFB Announces Gender Equality Initiative at #VIWIFF2016

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From left: Sharon McGowan, Rina Fraticelli, Claude Joli-Coeur, Karen Day, Susan Brinton

Women in Film + Television Vancouver is proud to have provided the venue for the groundbreaking announcement by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) in Vancouver on this International Women’s Day, March 8, 2016.

Coinciding with the start of the 11th Annual Vancouver International Women in Film Festival, Government Film Commissioner and NFB Chairperson Claude Joli-Coeur announced that at least half of its productions will be directed by women and half of all production spending will be allocated to films directed by women. Continue reading

When Giants Fall — A stunning status quo of ivory poaching across Africa

WGF_eyeA common view of the ivory poaching crisis is that it’s an old crisis. One that our parents had to worry about in the 1970s. Unfortunately, the resurgence of ivory poaching is very real, and more critical than it has ever been. Everyone has heard about blood diamonds, but how about blood ivory?

The problem is vast and complex, spanning many countries and cultures across the world. Elephants are dying by the hundreds every day, and so are people on both sides of the coin. It is an overwhelming topic to attempt to package in one feature documentary. Somehow, When Giants Fall, a documentary by journalist Leslie Griffith, manages to do just that. Continue reading

Norma’s Story – Animation Glimpses into Traditional Aboriginal Life – #VIWIFF2016

Normas story egg hill (1)The award-winning animated short film Norma’s Story runs under only five minutes, yet the message transcends time.

Director Alex Hawley takes the audience into a whimsical world that is part mid-century children’s book styling and traditional beadwork.  Continue reading

Mystery in the Woods – Lise Raven’s Kinderwald screens at #VIWIFF2016

KINDERWALD BOYS STILL 2In German folklore, the forest is a breeding ground for miracles, mysteries and the supernatural. Paying homage to the Black Forest of the Brothers Grimm, Kinderwald creates an ethereal, isolated and atmospheric woodland world of 1854 Pennsylvania.

Despite its apparent seclusion, this forest teems with characters of dubious, if not outright malevolent intent. The only exceptions seem to be the hardworking John Linden (Frank Brückner, who also co-wrote the script) , his dead brother’s wife, pious Flora (Emily Behr) and her two sons (Leo and Louie Fischer-Pasternak). Not long after settling in, the Linden children wander away, leaving their mother and uncle to endure a trial of faith through a dark and tumultuous fairy tale. Continue reading

#VIWIFF2016 Opens with Father-Daughter Tragicomedy “Café Derby”

CafeDerby09Café Derby invites you to take a look into the life of Georges: a man of the people with a big heart and even bigger dreams. When he mans his stall at the local market, it is crowded with people hanging off his every word. He knows which customers will buy what, how to make the pitch, and when to close the deal. With a family of five to feed, Georges is constantly on the lookout for the next big business venture. As far as his youngest daughter Sara is concerned, her father is the king of the world. Continue reading

Snapshot of a Stolen Childhood — The Chicken by Una Gunjak at #VIWIFF2016

By Mersiha Musovic

THE-CHICKEN_02_Selma(IMAN-ALIBALIC)The Chicken, by Writer/Director Una Gunjak, is a uniquely intense, yet very moving film, which takes the viewers back in time to 1993, to a volatile setting they might be unfamiliar with: the Bosnian War.  Continue reading

Trapped in Liminality: Tinatin Kajrishvili’s Brides Challenges Women’s Role in the Family

Brides_StillTinatin Kajrishvili’s first feature film, Brides (Patardzlebi, Georgia, 2014) is an unusual and unpredictable story of a limitless love in an unforgiving world. The film challenges the strength and survival of passionate love between Nusta (Mari Kitia), a young Georgian mother, and her husband Goga (Giorgi Maskharashvili), a man carrying out his seven-year prison sentence in Tbilisi. Their relationship is put to a test when Nutsa realizes Goga is not the only one trapped in a box. Nutsa is forced to push the boundaries of her commitment to the man she loves, and must reconcile with the anguish of waiting in the unknown. Continue reading